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Fluid catalytic cracking - Hydrocarbon Process

Posted by Antony Thomas at Tuesday, November 01, 2011


Fluid catalytic cracking

Application: FLEXICRACKING IIIR converts high-boiling hydrocarbons including
residues, gas oils, lube extracts and/or deasphalted oils to higher
value products.
Products: Light olefins for gasoline processes and petrochemicals, LPG,
blend stocks for high-octane gasoline, distillates and fuel oils.
Description: The FLEXICRACKING IIIR technology includes process design,
hardware details, special mechanical and safety features, control
systems, flue gas processing options and a full range of technical services
and support. The reactor (1) incorporates many features to enhance
performance, reliability and flexibility, including a riser (2) with patented
high-efficiency close-coupled riser termination (3), enhanced feed injection
system (4) and efficient stripper design (5). The reactor design and
operation maximizes the selectivity of desired products, such as naphtha
and propylene.
The technology uses an improved catalyst circulation system with
advanced control features, including cold-walled slide valves (6). The
single vessel regenerator (7) has proprietary process and mechanical features
for maximum reliability and efficient air/catalyst distribution and
contacting (8). Either full or partial combustion is used. With increasing
residue processing and the need for additional heat balance control,
partial burn operation with outboard CO combustion is possible, or KBR
dense phase catalyst cooler technology may be applied. The ExxonMobil
wet gas scrubbing or the ExxonMobil-KBR Cyclofines TSS technologies
can meet flue gas emission requirements.
 


Installation: More than 70 units with a design capacity of over 2.5-million
bpd fresh feed.
References: Ladwig, P. K., “Exxon FLEXICRACKING IIIR fl uid catalytic
cracking technology,” Handbook of Petroleum Refi ning Processes, Second
Ed., R. A. Meyers, Ed., pp. 3.3–3.28.
Licensor: ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co. and Kellogg Brown
& Root, Inc. (KBR).
 
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